Monthly Archives: December 2015

WordPress podcast and Calypso

I’ve become quite the fan of WordPress and Automattic over the last year, since finally switching. WordPress still has some problems — mostly in self-hosted web admin performance, and the clunkiness of editing themes — but Automattic is a good company. Around web publishing and hosting, I think 2 platforms are going to last for decades: GitHub and WordPress.

There’s a great interview with Automattic founder Matt Mullenweg on the Post Status podcast:

“I had the opportunity to interview Matt Mullenweg about an ambitious project that included more than a year and a half of development to create an all new WordPress.com interface, both for the web and a desktop app. The project was codenamed Calypso, and we talked about many aspects of Calypso, as well as a variety of subjects that relate to it.”

After listening to this episode, I’ve subscribed to the podcast. Looking forward to being a little more aware of what is going on in the WordPress community.

Swift and Core Intuition 209

Like many developers, I’ve spent the morning looking over the Swift open source release. I continue to be intrigued and look forward to working Swift into more of my routine.

On today’s Core Intuition, Daniel and I talked about Swift for about half of the 50-minute episode. We recorded the episode yesterday afternoon, before the open source announcement, so we’ll be following up next week on everything that has changed. I bet there will be some more progress in Swift web server frameworks by then, too.

I knew it was December, but didn’t really hit me until today that months have gone by without shipping the app I’ve wanted to announce all year.

→ 2015/12/02 5:31 pm

Getting ready to record another episode of Core Intuition. You can bet we’ll be talking about the Mac App Store. When listeners get tired of that, we’ll go back to complaining about Swift. (Kidding! Mostly.)

→ 2015/12/02 1:29 pm

Too late to save the MAS?

You’ve probably heard the news about Sketch. I found this section of their announcement the most interesting, because it highlights that this isn’t just about technical and strategic problems with the Mac App Store, but also about having a direct relationship with the customer to provide the best experience:

“Over the last year, as we’ve made great progress with Sketch, the customer experience on the Mac App Store hasn’t evolved like its iOS counterpart. We want to continue to be a responsive, approachable, and easily-reached company, and selling Sketch directly allows us to give you a better experience.”

Of course, Sketch joins a growing list of apps unavailable in the store. From John Gruber:

“Sketch isn’t the first big name professional app to be pulled from the Mac App Store (Bare Bones Software’s BBEdit, Panic’s Coda, Quicken, just to name a few). But Sketch is the poster child for Mac App Store era professional Mac software. It’s the sort of app Apple might demo in a keynote — and the winner of an Apple Design Award.”

Federico Viticci writes that Apple has to do something:

“The simple reality is that, gradually, developers of the best apps for OS X are finding it increasingly hard to justify doing business on the Mac App Store. I hope Apple also sees this as a problem and starts doing something about it.”

Daniel and I talked about this on Core Intuition recently. Developers have been complaining about the Mac App Store for years without seeing any progress. It was over 3 years ago that I pulled my app Clipstart from the Mac App Store to sell direct-only instead, because of my concerns about adapting to sandboxing.

All this time, Apple could have been iterating on the Mac App Store, improving sandboxing entitlements, improving review times, customer interaction, and more. Yet they have not. At this point, Apple can’t just do “something”. They can’t just improve the Mac App Store a little. They have to significantly improve it, addressing many issues at once. And even then, some of these great apps — Sketch, BBEdit, Coda, RapidWeaver — may not come back.

It’s time to stop giving Apple a pass on this Lightning audio cable rumor. Seems very misguided. We have so few truly open, compatible standards left, why kill off the ones that work fine?

→ 2015/12/01 9:27 am