Tag Archives: podcast

Core Intuition 330 and WWDC

We just posted our pre-WWDC podcast episode:

Manton and Daniel check in just before WWDC to talk about expectations from the conference, and strategies for saving money on the trip. They indulge in a bit more Siri criticism, hope that Apple will announce new MacBook Pros, and question whether Apple will dare to poke fun at Google’s Duplex technology during the keynote.

If you’ll be in San Jose, hope to see you at the Micro.blog lunch meetup on Tuesday. I’d love to talk to listeners about Micro.blog or Core Intuition, and we have a major update to Sunlit in beta that I’ll be showing off.

Wavelength 1.0.2

We just wrapped up a bunch of improvements to the initial Wavelength for Micro.blog app. Here are the changes:

  • Updated MP3s to 128 kbps, mono. We’ll consider adding a preference for quality and stereo in the future.
  • Fixed playback volume using correct iPhone speaker.
  • Fixed a few potential crashes and improved publishing error messages.
  • Fixed Auphonic username field to not use auto-correct.
  • Fixed glitches with consistently using external microphones.
  • Fixed error sometimes when splitting segments.

I recorded and edited the last 2 episodes of Timetable exclusively with Wavelength on my iPhone X. It’s really great to see some new microcasts pop up over the last few days. Thanks for trying it out!

Wavelength for Micro.blog

We have something really big to announce today. Micro.blog now supports hosting short-form podcasts, also known as microcasts, with a companion iPhone app called Wavelength for recording, editing, and publishing episodes.

Wavelength screenshots

Before the Kickstarter campaign last year, I started my Timetable microcast to talk about the things I was working on, with a focus on planning what would become Micro.blog. Creating a short podcast is really fun. It’s much easier to record and edit than the longer podcasts we’re all used to. But it’s still not easy enough, and even after nearly 100 episodes of Timetable my workflow was cobbled together with too many apps: Ferrite, Logic, Auphonic, WordPress, a shell script, and sometimes Transmit.

Micro.blog is about making short-form content you own as simple to post as a tweet because we believe blogging should be easier. Podcasting should be easier too.

We’re rolling out a new hosted plan on Micro.blog to accommodate microcasts. When you upload an audio file to your site — either from the web, Wavelength, or a third-party app — Micro.blog will automatically create a podcast feed for your microblog. Listeners can subscribe directly, or you can add the feed to the Apple Podcast Directory and it will show up in popular apps like Overcast and Castro. Everything can be served from your own domain name, just like a normal microblog. We’ve been using this infrastructure for all the episodes of our weekly Micro Monday microcast.

New hosted microblogs with microcasting support will be $10/month. Microcast audio files will be limited to 20 MB. Existing microblogs hosted on Micro.blog can be upgraded to support microcasting for an additional $5/month.

Everyone has a story to tell. Whether that’s through short microblog posts, longer essays, photo blogs, conversations with friends, or now through podcasts, I hope that the Micro.blog platform and suite of apps can help. If you haven’t checked out Micro.blog lately or are learning about it for the first time, now is a great time to join the community. Thanks!

Introducing the Micro Monday microcast

We’ve started a new podcast! Jean MacDonald will be hosting a weekly show talking with members of the Micro.blog community. I join her on the first episode to talk about our blogs and goals for the podcast.

You can listen to Micro Monday on the web, subscribe in Overcast, or follow @monday on Micro.blog. Thanks for listening! Update: Check out our subscribe page for more links.

Core Intuition 312

New episode of Core Intuition is out. We talk about what’s new with Micro.blog, cryptocurrency, and more:

Manton talks to Daniel about just missing jury duty during a busy work week. They talk about the virtues of differentiating a product by both features and personality. Finally, they react to the Stellar cryptocurrency’s surprising value, and the potential for cryptocurrency and blockchain technology to change the world.

Thanks for listening!

Core Intuition 302

We posted episode 302 of Core Intuition today. From the show notes:

Manton and Daniel anticipate the night of iPhone X pre-orders, and the shame of waking in the middle of the night to order a phone. They catch up with their faltering ambitions to ship MarsEdit and Micro.blog, and acknowledge the merit of sharing ambitions with others to help motivate progress. Finally, they contemplate whether eliminating a feature altogether is preferable to shipping it with obvious deficiencies.

Good luck to everyone trying to pre-order an iPhone X tonight!

Extra Intuition 2 with Gus Mueller

Just posted episode 2 of our members-only podcast Extra Intuition, with special guest Gus Mueller! From the show notes:

Daniel and Manton are joined by Gus Mueller of Flying Meat. They talk about their early days in the indie Mac community, and Gus’s commitment to developing for the Mac. Along the way Gus let us know about a new Mac app he’s working on, and invited listeners to get in touch about beta testing it!

Gus announces a brand new Mac app he’s working on. Really exciting to see this when it ships. You can listen by becoming a member.

Extra Intuition

Daniel and I wanted to do something special for our 300th episode, so we’ve launched a membership program for Core Intuition listeners. Included in the membership is access to a brand new podcast we call Extra Intuition, plus a private Slack channel for members to discuss the show and suggest future topics.

It’s been a fun journey over the last 9 years of recording Core Intuition, and the main podcast will stay as it has been, with new episodes for free every week. Extra Intuition is our chance to deviate a little from the formula and try something new.

Daniel has also posted about the membership and first episode:

Our first episode of Extra Intuition is already live, and it features a discussion about the early days of our friendship, and how we decided to start Core Intuition.

We’d love your support. Thanks for listening!

Timetable 66 and Release Notes

I posted a new Timetable today after listening to the Release Notes podcast where Charles and Joe discuss requiring in-app purchase subscriptions. As I talk about on Timetable, I’ve been working on the Mac version of Micro.blog, so it was a good opportunity to make a final decision on Mac App Store support.

Speaking of Release Notes, I’ll be out in Chicago for the conference next week. If you’re attending, hope to see you there. Ask me for a Micro.blog sticker.

Core Intuition 299

One more week until our 300th episode! From the show notes for today’s episode:

Daniel and Manton talk about Daniel’s struggle to finish and release MarsEdit 4. They compare notes about using the WordPress API to import content, and Manton reveals he is working on a Mac app for Micro.blog. They check in about the impact that increasing competition, or perception of it, on their long-time friendship and collaboration.

We’re announcing something new next week. Hope you can tune in for it.

Overthinking stats

Manuel Riess has been writing about why he didn’t stick with previous blogs. On the topic of paying too much attention to stats:

When using WordPress, it’s easy to get the basic numbers of interest: how many visitors, from which part of the world etc. The next level is Google Analytics… what a plethora of settings and numbers! I stared at them all the time after a new post went up, it was exhausting.

I highlighted Manuel’s microblog in an email to Kickstarter backers recently, as an example of using custom domain names. You can follow him on Micro.blog.

I still haven’t looked at stats for Timetable. And I’ve resisted adding follower counts and page view stats to Micro.blog for the same reason. If all that drives you is the number of likes on a tweet, or subscribers to your podcast, it’s easy to get discouraged when the numbers don’t pan out. Or worse, overthink your writing when you know a bunch of people are paying attention.

Everyone has something to say. Write because you love it, or to become a better writer, or to develop an idea. The stats should be an afterthought.

Timetable 54

I posted a new episode of my Timetable microcast. Here’s a bit from today’s episode about blogging and tweeting:

My “blog first” strategy is actually really simple. I just follow the rule that I never post directly to Twitter unless I’m replying to a question. If I want to post something to Twitter, I fire up MarsEdit on my Mac, or I open the Micro.blog iOS app, and I post it there. Then of course Micro.blog sees that and sends it to Twitter for me.

I’m getting back into the groove of publishing these episodes. This was the third episode of Timetable this week.

Core Intuition 296

We posted a new Core Intuition, all about the iPhone X and other products from yesterday’s event. From the show notes:

Manton and Daniel react to the announcement at Apple’s annual iPhone event, comparing notes on the allure of the iPhone X, Apple Watch 3, and new Apple TV. They talk about the impressiveness of all the significant product updates being made in parallel, and lament the slightly confusing state it leaves the high end iPhone market in.

Approaching 300 episodes over 9 years. If you’re new to the podcast, consider subscribing in your favorite podcast app. Thanks!

Core Intuition 295

Slightly longer Core Intuition this week as we cover several topics. From the show notes:

Daniel and Manton follow up briefly on Manton’s backup strategy, and catch up with Daniel’s progress with MarsEdit. They talk about the merits of using cryptographic signing for software licenses, and balance the risks and rewards of combatting piracy. Daniel talks about the recurring lure of taking a salaried job, and how the privileges of staying indie continue to win out. Finally, they look forward to next week’s iPhone event and the expected hardware announcements from Apple.

I’m excited about the upcoming iPhone event on Tuesday. Seems like it’s set to be a big one.

Core Intuition 287

We just posted Core Intuition episode 287, following up on Chris Lattner, WWDC, and Uber. From the show notes:

Daniel and Manton react to Chris Lattner’s early departure from Tesla, and segue into speculation about his job prospects, and the challenges of effective technical interviews. They talk about the new frameworks announced at WWDC, and overcoming fear of incompetence when learning new things. Finally, they react to Uber CEO Travis Kalanick’s resignation, and think about what’s next for the company.

Thanks for listening. If you’re new to the show, you can subscribe in iTunes or Overcast.

Jeremy Keith on Presentable and the IndieWeb

I know there are so many great podcasts that it’s difficult to listen to everything. I’m still making my way through all the commentary about WWDC. But I just finished Jeff Veen’s Presentable episode 25 this week and particularly enjoyed it.

Jeff talked to Jeremy Keith about his new web design book, and about the web industry repeating the same old mistakes, with a really great discussion about the IndieWeb. When asked about how people prefer to post on a social network, because maybe fewer people will find their own site, Jeremy said:

I always get frustrated when people talk about this as a reason not to do something. For me, that was the whole point of the web — that nobody was stopping you. You’re right, maybe nobody will read this thing that I’ve published, but I could publish it and nobody was stopping me. To see people stop themselves, to act as their own gatekeeper…

There’s much more that I can’t capture in a truncated quote. Highly recommend listening to the full interview in context.

Core Intuition 285 and WWDC

We posted a new Core Intuition this week about WWDC. From the show notes:

Daniel and Manton catch upon WWDC, and Manton’s ailing MacBook Pro. They talk about new hardware announcements and react to highlights from the Keynote. Manton laments Apple’s continued, slow progress with SiriKit, and Daniel is frustrated that HomePod is not a Wifi hub. Finally, they talk about iOS Drag and Drop and compare it with Apple’s traditional tendency to move slowly but surely into the future.

After we recorded, I watched the first episode of Planet of the Apps, and started to get into more of the conference session videos. We’ll be following up next week on more from WWDC.

WWDC moves back to San Jose

I have a tradition when I go to San Francisco for WWDC. I arrive early on Sunday before the conference, drop my bags at the hotel, and take a cab to the Presidio. The weather is usually beautiful. I visit the Walt Disney Family Museum, maybe sit in the grass with a coffee, then go for a walk to take in views of the Golden Gate Bridge.

I’ve done this the last handful of years. It’s always a perfect reset to whatever stress was happening with my own coding projects and business. You can find blog posts and tweets from past years.

I attended WWDC in San Jose a few times. Moving WWDC back there will probably end up being fine. If you’re at the convention center, or hanging out with attendees at a restaurant, or taking a break to work at a coffee shop around the corner, or even going to a party — many cities will suffice for that. I’m sure the conference will be great.

I’ll still miss San Francisco. I know it’s not a perfect city. But it’s historic and unique. That’s why I recorded a podcast episode about it over 10 years ago, and I’ve learned much more since. I always get something out of the trip.

Timetable 37

I’m taking some time to resume Timetable recording. From the latest episode:

Now that the Kickstarter campaign has wrapped up, I move to the next phase of getting Micro.blog ready, planning for invites, and focusing on the Slack community.

I started Timetable over a year ago to document what it was like to build Micro.blog and figure out how to launch it. Each episode is about 4-5 minutes long. Reaching this point with the Kickstarter finished is a huge milestone, but there is plenty of work still to do and talk about.

Exponent 102

Maybe you aren’t building a new social network. Maybe you aren’t obsessed with the rise and fall of tech giants. But if you are at all interested in why Instagram and Snapchat took off, check out episode 102 of Exponent with Ben Thompson and James Allworth:

Ben and James discuss the history of messaging apps, the rise of Snapchat, and why Instagram Stories was such a brilliant move.

I feel like I just had a whirlwind business school class in 57 minutes. So much of what they talk about is applicable to what I’m working on.