Tag Archives: slack

Interview at The Brooks Review

I talked with Ben Brooks over Slack this week about Micro.blog and JSON Feed. From the chat:

Micro.blog and JSON Feed share a common goal, which is to encourage more blogging on the open web, and new tools that can make blogging easier. I feel like we’ve gotten off course a little since the early days of blogging, with so many people now putting all of their writing into closed, centralized platforms like Twitter or Facebook. I think we can make it easier to own your own content, have your own domain name, and maybe learn from the UI in modern social networks too.

Slack makes for a really interesting interview format. Some of the spontaneity of a podcast, but with live editing and an automatic transcript. Similar to what Talkshow.im was trying to do before they shut down.

Timetable 37

I’m taking some time to resume Timetable recording. From the latest episode:

Now that the Kickstarter campaign has wrapped up, I move to the next phase of getting Micro.blog ready, planning for invites, and focusing on the Slack community.

I started Timetable over a year ago to document what it was like to build Micro.blog and figure out how to launch it. Each episode is about 4-5 minutes long. Reaching this point with the Kickstarter finished is a huge milestone, but there is plenty of work still to do and talk about.

Microblogging community on Slack

Since I launched on Kickstarter, backers have asked if there should be a Slack community to discuss Micro.blog and related microblogging topics. I wasn’t sure. I know some people are already in multiple Slack groups, including the excellent IndieWebCamp IRC/Slack, and I also didn’t want to distract from any posts that should happen in the open on blogs.

Some discussion just fits better in chat, though. There’s an emerging community of indie microbloggers. Having a place to share tips, tools, and ask questions about Micro.blog just makes sense.

I’m experimenting with the Slack channel now, and I’ll be opening it to all Kickstarter backers next week. If you’ve backed the project before Monday, expect a backers-only project update with information on how to join.

Two weeks notice: podcast revenue

In my first post I framed the situation as pinning my indie hopes on two things: my own apps and client work. But as Daniel points out, I’ve actually lucked into several distinct revenue sources. And one of the most promising continues to be our Core Intuition podcast sponsorships and the companion jobs site.

The podcast got some good news over the weekend as we’re adding another long-term sponsor. We’ve had this company as sponsors in the past, and I’m looking forward to having them back and talking about how I use their products.

Like software, revenue from Core Intuition comes in waves. Sometimes we’ll be booked up for months, other times there will be a drought of sponsors, so we’ll focus on pitching the jobs site instead. Sometimes we’ll get new job listings every day, other times a week will go by with nothing. Since we’re not actively marketing it as if it was a full-time business, we can’t count on any kind of consistency from it.

It’s funny how the podcast worked out, though. We started it just because we thought it would be neat — because we thought we had something to share with the community, back in 2008 when there were very few developer podcasts. We added sponsorships to help justify the time and keep us to a weekly schedule. And now, ironically, the podcast that was about running an indie business will actually help me do just that.

I’m so grateful to listeners new and old who have supported us. I received a bunch of nice “congrats!” emails and mentions on our Slack channels yesterday. We’re approaching 200 episodes now, over 7 years, and I hope we can continue to keep the podcast interesting for some time to come.

Core Int 180 and Slack

We posted this week’s Core Intuition late last night. This episode is all about WWDC tickets, our plan for San Francisco, and when we’re going to adopt Swift.

We’re also trying something new for listeners, or anyone who wants to talk about programming, WWDC, and other Mac and iOS topics. You can get an automatic invite to our Slack channels for the show by visiting chat.coreint.org. Feel free to join in! I’ve been impressed with how well Slack works for this, and the great discussion that’s already happening there.

Building Slack

Stewart Butterfield, co-founder of Flickr and his latest company Tiny Speck, published an internal email from around the middle of development on their collaboration app Slack:

“There’s no point doing this to be small. We should go big, if only because there are a lot of people in the world who deserve Slack. Going big also means that it will have to be really, really good. But that’s convenient, since there’s also no point doing it if it is not really, really good.”

It’s long but there’s a lot of good stuff in it on marketing and building a product people need.